Introducing Mount Diablo

Why is this 3,849-foot mountain so central to California’s natural and human history? Discover the lore and legends of this remarkable place. Perfect for your first (or 100th) drive up the mountain! Sponsored by Save Mount Diablo and the California State Parks Foundation, 2010. Featuring Seth Adams and Ken Lavin, with Carl Magruder as William Brewer. Music by Phil Heywood.

Basecamp: sample the sights and sounds in the 12 segments ahead.
Music: “Manna from Kokomo,” Circle Tour, Phil Heywood. Photos: Oaks on ridge (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com), Mt. Diablo from Clayton Ranch (©Scott Hein), Shell Ridge Open Space (©Scott Hein), Morgan Territory Sunrise (“Ready to Go) (©Scott Hein). Voices: Seth Adams, Beverly Ortiz, Mike Moran, Seth Adams, Carl Nielson.
A real wilderness within an hour’s drive of 7 million people.
Music: “Circle Tour,” Circle Tour, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Mount Diablo Sunset (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com), Mount Diablo from Highland Ridge in Morgan Territory Regional Preserve (©Scott Hein), To the Northwest (©John Karachewski, www.geoscapesphotography.com/), Sutter Buttes, To the East (©John Karachewski), Mt. Hamilton, To the South, SF Bay (©John Karachewski), Looking Southwest, Seth Adams (Jim Robbins), A Spiritual Place, Across the Hills to the West, Dr. John Marsh (courtesy John Marsh Historic Trust), “Double Pyramid Peak” (©Scott Hein), Baseline and Meridian (courtesy Mount Diablo Surveyors Historical Society), Delta, Cobweb Thistle, Baby-Blue-Eyes, Spring Beauty, Bitterroot, Coulter Pine, Dudlea, Mount Diablo Fairy Lantern, Mount Diablo Sunset (©Scott Hein). 
Wildlife columnist Gary Bogue describes the mountain’s menagerie, including coyotes, golden eagles, rattlesnakes, ring-tailed cats, and opossums.
Music: “Medley: Spirituals in C,” You Got to Move, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Coyote Hunting (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com), Coyote Staring (©Scott Hein), Diablo Forest (©Scott Hein, Chaparral (©Scott Hein), Tiger Salamander (©Gary Nafis, www.CaliforniaHerps.com), Horned Lizard (©Gary Nafis), Golden Eagle (Dave Herr USFS), Red-tailed Hawk (©Joe Oliver), Ground Squirrel (Bruce Hamilton), Eastern Fox Squirrel (©Joe Oliver), Gray Fox (USFWS), Red Fox (Ronald Laubenstein, USFWS), Ring-tailed Cat (Bob Hines, USFWS) and Opossum on Grass (ciStockphoto.com/Karon Troup), Striped Skunk (©Scott Hein,), Northern Alligator Lizard (©Scott Hein), Gopher Snake (©Gary Nafis), Rattlesnake (©Gary Nafis), Ring-tailed Cat (Bob Hines, USFWS), Opossum on Grass (©iStockphoto.com/Karon Troup), “Playing” Possum (©iStockphoto.com/Charles Schug), Opossum (©iStockphoto.com/Judy Foldetta).
People don’t see these elusive cats very often. But they’re on the mountain. What should you do if you encounter one on a hike?
Music: “The Thaw,” Circle Tour, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Silhouette (©iStockphoto.com/John Pitcher), Gary Bogue (Lois Bogue), Bobcat (Wikipedia Commons), Mountain Lion (©iStockphoto.com/John Pitcher), Bobcat (©iStockphoto.com/Brian Sak), Bobcat track (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), Mountain Lion Track (Michigan Department of Natural Resources), Mountain Lion Closeup (©iStockphoto.com/Joshua Haviv), Cubs (©iStockphoto.com/Tom Tietz), Mountain Lion on Rock (©iStockphoto.com/Forest Chaput de Saintonge), Mountain Lion Closeup (©iStockphoto.com/Joshua Haviv), Shell Ridge, Closeup 2 (©iStockphoto.com/Forest Chaput de Saintonge), Silhouette (©iStockphoto.com/John Pitcher), Tarantula.
Nineteenth century scientist William Brewer picked the one thing to be frightened of that couldn’t hurt him.
Music: “Fred Meets Joni,” You Got to Move, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Tarantula, William Brewer (Save Mount Diablo), California State Geological Survey (Save Mount Diablo), Ken Lavin (Seth Adams), Lavin’s Pet, Mature Male, Tarantula Burrow, Mature Male, Where Spiders Die, “Tarantella,” Henrique Bernardelli (Wikimedia Commons), European Black Widow (Wikimedia Commons, K. Korlevic), Poison Oak.
What hikers need to know to avoid this problematic plant.
Music: “Gone Too Soon,” Circle Tour, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Poison Oak, Summer, Twig, Up a Tree, Winter, Seth Adams (Jim Robbins), Spring, Fall.
People who see these hairy rototillers from afar sometimes say, “I didn’t know there were bears on the mountain!”
Music: “Old River Man/One Funky Dime,” You Got to Move, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Wild Pig (©iStockphoto.com/Eduard Kyslynsky, Wild Pig (©iStockphoto.com/Dave Sangster), Like a Bulldozer, Pine Canyon, Riggs Canyon (Ken Lavin), Wild Pig (©iStockphoto.com/Dave Sangster).
Some 250 years ago, native peoples had Mount Diablo all to themselves. 
Music: “Folk Song,” You Got to Move, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Mount Diablo from Marsh Creek, Meyer Straus, 1876; Looking South; Clematis and Poison Oak; Oak; Elderberry; Water World; Island Peaks (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com); Upper Slopes (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com); From Morgan Territory (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com), Mount Diablo from Marsh Creek, Meyer Straus, 1876.
Imagine it’s 1860. The easy gold has already been taken, and now it’s time to make better maps and take a clear-eyed look at the state’s mineral wealth . . .
Music: “Circle Tour,” Circle Tour, by Phil Heywood. Photos: William Brewer’s 1864 Field Party (Courtesy Save Mount Diablo), William Brewer (Wikipedia Commons) , The Survey Party Camp Near Mount Diablo in 1862 (Courtesy Save Mount Diablo), San Ramon Valley from Shell Ridge, William Brewer’s 1864 Field Party (Courtesy Save Mount Diablo), Owl’s Clover, Poppies, Red Larkspur, North Peak, Looking North, Looking South, Devil’s Pulpit, Delta (©John Karachewski, www.geoscapesphotography.com/), Looking Southwest (©John Karachewski), Sutter Buttes, Sierra Nevada (©John Karachewski), San Francisco (©John Karachewski) Mount Diablo (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com).
Just north of Mount Diablo, “black diamonds” paved the way for California’s industrial development in the second half of the nineteenth century. 
Music: “Fred Meets Joni,” You Got to Move, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Coal (©iStockphoto/Andrew Horwitz), Mike Moran, Nortonville (courtesy East Bay Regional Park District), Black Diamond Mines, Coal (©iStockphoto/Andrew Horwitz).
Just north of Mount Diablo, “black diamonds” paved the way for California’s industrial development in the second half of the nineteenth century. 
Music: “Fred Meets Joni,” You Got to Move, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Coal (©iStockphoto/Andrew Horwitz), Mike Moran, Nortonville (courtesy East Bay Regional Park District), Black Diamond Mines, Coal (©iStockphoto/Andrew Horwitz).
Starting in the 1870s, people with dollar signs in their eyes began selling the mountain to tourists and investors.
Music: “Movin’ With the Moon,” You Got to Move, by Phil Heywood. Photos: “Marvelous Mount Diablo” poster (courtesy Save Mount Diablo), Joseph Seavey Hall (Courtesy Save Mount Diablo), Mountain House (courtesy Save Mount Diablo), John Muir (Wikipedia Commons), Mountain House (courtesy Save Mount Diablo) Robert Burgess (courtesy Save Mount Diablo), Burgess’s Plan (courtesy Save Mount Diablo), Torre del Sol (courtesy Save Mount Diablo), “Marvelous Mount Diablo” poster (courtesy Save Mount Diablo).
More than a million people visit Mount Diablo State Park annually, to walk, run, hike, climb, picnic, bicycle, paraglide, and ride horses. What’s the most popular activity? Going to the top and gazing down at big, broad swaths of wild California.
Music: “Manna From Kokomo,” Circle Tour, by Phil Heywood. Photos: Carl Nielson, Carl Nielson, The Peak (©Scott Hein, www.heinphoto.com), The View (©Scott Hein), Rock City, Elephant Rock, Mountain Biking, Road Biking (©Carl Nielson), Hiking (©Scott Hein), Horseback Riding (©Scott Hein), Hiking (©Scott Hein), Horseback Riding Spring (©Scott Hein), Mount Diablo (©Scott Hein), Spring, Fall, Tarantula, Wild Rose, Many Admirers (©Scott Hein).
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